Autumn Fly Fishing Tips

bart beasley autumn fly fishing

When Autumn rolls around, the weather cools off, the leaves start to change, and anglers around the world face new challenges in the water that are specific to the season. The conditions differ from the summer in that the streams and rivers are typically lower and clearer than during the summer. The water is not blanketed by crisp, newly fallen leaves, the water getting colder, and with the shorter days the sun angles change as well.

All of these challenges change the way anglers approach the Autumn opposed the summer. To solve the puzzle that is fly fishing in the Autumn, and to adapt to changing conditions, try out some of these helpful tips to give yourself the best day possible on the water.

Lower Sun

As the days get shorter and winter approaches, the sun gets lower in the sky on a typical day compared to the summer. With lower sun angles throughout the day, longer shadows require an angler to more stealthy in the water. What you don’t want to happen here is the fish getting spooked by you. Make sure to pay attention to the sun’s position while you are out on the water. Paying close attention to your shadows, and where they are being cast will be crucial in your success.

Dress Appropriately

As mentioned above, being mindful of the sun’s position is important, but low and clear water conditions makes it much easier to fish to see what’s going on above the water’s surface.  As for any kind of hunting activity, your clothing is an important factor. To stay stealthy, stick to Autumn colors, or even camouflage if needed.

Know What You Are Fishing

Some species of fish spawn in the late summer and get more aggressive and agitated come the fall. These behavioural changes are a direct result of the spawning, which creates more competition, and increased territoriality. The upside to this is that makes the Autumn one of the best times to fly fish. With all of this said, thinking about the fly size, the color, and aim for a cranky fish can be important. These fish while aggressive, are more likely to chase and find streamers and other flies a disturbance to a trout trying to spawn.
Fly fishing in the Autumn can be one of the most challenging experiences, even for the most seasoned angler. Making sure you are properly prepared for the conditions you are about to face can help you find the most success. Good luck and have fun out on the water this fall!

Best Fly Fishing States

American fly fishing

Fly fishing in the United States is getting more and more popular. As the popularity increases the best places to fish are becoming more and more sought after. The United States has some of the best fly fishing destinations in the world, with all corners of the States represented.

Florida

By far the best saltwater fly fishing in the States, The Keys have very big bonefish, and are loaded with tarpon as well. The Everglades, also are known for tarpon, redfish, snook and largemouth bass. In the Panhandle area, you’ll find tarpon and reds, but Florida’s real special fly fishing characteristic is in the canals, ditches, lakes and ponds, always full of largemouth bass.

Montana

A very popular destination for anglers. Montana features: Yellowstone, the Big Horn, the Madison, the rivers in Yellowstone National Park, the Beaverhead, the Missouri, and all of those creeks. The list can go on forever, Montana is the best trout fishing state in the union.

North Carolina

The variety that North Carolina has is why it makes this list. The mountains have trout streams, and populations of native brook trout. The piedmont area is filled with reservoirs and there are thousands of farm ponds that are filled with largemouth bass and bluegills. The Roanoke River gets one of the best runs of striped bass every year. And don’t forget the coast, where you can catch both stripers and redfish, exclusive to the area.

New York

Long Island Sound and the southern beaches of the island make for the best striped bass, bluefish, and false albacore fishing in the States. Plus people forget how big and vast of a state New York is. The Catskills alone offer some of the best trout fishing east of the rockies with the Beaverkill, the Willowemoc, and the Neversick. The Adirondacks also have a legendary reputation for the lakes and streams that flow through it. Don’t forget about the Great Lakes either providing some of the best salmon and steelhead runs in the nation. Most of the species in New York aren’t native, but the variety alone makes New York one of the best fishing spots in the period.

Alaska

The fishing season is very short, only lasting a few months. But those in those short months, Alaska makes it count. Salmon, steelhead, resident rainbows, grayling, northern pike, and even some grizzly bears hanging out make the final frontier that much more alluring.

Fly Fishing Tips for Beginners

bart beasly flyfishing

Fly fishing is considered a sport by some, but for others it’s a lifestyle. Learning to fly fish can provide a lifetime of memories to the weekend fishermen, or the avid fly fisher. To get started in the sport, there’s a few basic things to know, knowing the correct gear, using the right techniques, being prepared, and knowing which species to focus on.

Most fly fisherman to pursue trout, but most anglers try fishing for everything from largemouth bass, to big game saltwater species like marlin, tarpon, and sometimes sharks. In America, fly fishermen generally spend their time on rainbow trout, but other species such as golden trout, steelhead trout, and brown trout are sought after.

The locations you fish can vary from the ocean, to the backcountry of creeks and lakes.To really master your craft, many anglers practice at home, casting in their front yard or in a park. Fly fishing is catching on all over the world, from U.S. National Parks, like Yosemite, or fishing for bass in the Amazon River, or hurting carp in Europe, the the strong outdoor heritage has popularized the sport.

Having the proper gear is another piece in the introduction to fly fishing. Gear is always evolving, the fly, rod, reel, and lime have always been fly fishing staples. Anglers are also known for the dozens of different knots they use, which correlate with the type of fly line, leader, and tippet. While, fly fishing can be on the expensive side, with typical fly rods costing more than $100, but finding bargains for beginners and seasoned anglers alike is common.

The techniques, you incorporate can change from season to season. Variables are dependant on a hourly basis sometimes, or when insects are present, hatching eggs on or in the water. The river trout are the most popular fish for fly fisherman, but can be difficult to find sometimes. This makes nymph fishing, fishing below the surface with bottom dwelling insects and sculpin patterns a popular approach. But keeping in mind when the temperatures rise, it can make a fisherman have to incorporate dry pattern techniques.

Lastly, being prepared for anything that fly fishing can throw at you is an essential quality. Being patient and developing your own techniques over time is the best advice a beginner angler can receive. Doing things as simple as casting in your front yard, or working on tying flies can prepare yourself to have a enjoyable, and successful fishing experience.